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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Wed Aug 31, 2011 11:39 pm 
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I got this picture of a 1.5cm jumping spider with my SLR Canon Rebel t1i with the standard 18-55mm lens it comes with. It can get annoying because too close and it's blurry and on autofocus sometimes even when it's focused it doesn't lock on to the subject and thus does not take the photo but quickly switch to manual and problem's solved :] On Amazon this is about $650 so it's good for a beginner but still takes amazing photos :] One downside is that the shutter's pretty loud so this guy got pretty mad (as you can see in the second picture) and looked at me every few shots xD


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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Thu Sep 01, 2011 3:43 am 
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Thanks for sharing! From your profile and your avatar, you enjoy photography. We need more around enjoying the topic and sharing, so thanks again!



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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 3:35 am 
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This picture was taken with a "entry level" DSLR.

Image

1. Lighting is everything
2. Always use manual focusing with macro photography(even with your kit lens)
3. Practice, Practice, Practice!!

Happy shooting! :D


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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2013 11:51 pm 
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Location: Chandler Arizona
Love jumping spiders, thanks for the awsome pics! I need to ask for a decent camera for festivus, my old one & the ones on my phone & tablet just dont cut it. The jumping spiders at my house are brown to grey, but I remember the beautifully colored ones like in your pictures from childhood. Thanks for sharing!



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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 19, 2013 6:12 am 
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Location: Tycho Base, Luna
Jumping spiders always seem to be some of the toughtest of subjects. You want to get their attention, so they'll look at you, but too much activity and they run away. It's always hit and miss for me.
Anyone have any tips to get them to look at the camera and smile??


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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Sun Oct 20, 2013 2:27 am 
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Location: Any place in North America where 6 wheels can take me. See my website.
Sean C. wrote:
... Also, in the TKG they refer to having a Headband Magnifier as well as a magnifying lens. Can anyone give me a better understanding of what exactly Id be purchasing here? This is an example of what I was looking at and became confused with. I assume a basic model is sufficient but really wouldnt know. ...


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I have also been experimenting with some of the inexpensive digital, USB microscopes currently available.

Here are a few photos taken with one of mine. (Click or right-click the thumbnails to see larger images.)

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(Unknown species.)

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(Unknown species.)

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(Internal female organs on the molted exoskeleton of an unknown species of tarantula.)

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(Baby Chromatopelma cyaneopubescens - Greenbottle blue tarantula.)

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(Ocular tubercle from a molted carapace of Brachypelma albopilosum showing the eyes and their lenses.)

Of the four scopes that I have tried, none came with working software. (Three came with blank disks, the third wouldn't recognize the scope.) Two scopes didn't work at all with any software. (I was told that the software that came with Windows to run the webcam on my laptop would also run the scope, but I wasted about three afternoons proving that was a fallacy!) And, the only one that came with anything resembling a respectable stand was one of those that didn't work.

I ended up using the best (though far from perfect) stand on one of the scopes that worked but didn't have software. Instead, I downloaded some software off a completely unrelated website that does okay, but not great. Although I almost never mention commercial names on these forums, I must now advise you that if you choose to buy such a scope, at least get it through Amazon. If it doesn't work, Amazon will act in your behalf to try to get a refund for you. And this works maybe better than half the time. Here's a photo of my current scope more or less in action.

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When choosing such a scope, do not be overly impressed with high magnifications. Those are all lies. You want one that starts at about 10X and goes up to about 100X, and even that's too high to be useful under the circumstances you have to use it under. Try to find something in their specs that says you can get an image of 1600 X 1200 pixels. That's about 2 MP and will give you fair enough resolution that you can use photo editing software (e.g., MS Paint, packaged with most Windows versions) to crop and resize the image, and still show a reasonable end result.

Plan on pirating or cobbling together a better stand for yourself. Almost all of the stands they ship are worthless. You need an easily adjustable, rock solid one. Practice will show you what I mean. I'm seriously considering buying a basic laboratory ring stand with a lab flask clamp.

For instance, the last photo (ocular tubercle) started out as a 1280 X 1024 pixel image of the front half of the carapace. I cropped away all but a 400 X 300 pixel portion around the tubercle, then resized it to 800 X 600 pixels to get what you see here. I didn't measure the size of the tubercle on the original carapace, but a reasonable guess would be that it was about 1/8" (3.2 mm) in its longest dimension. Measure the longest dimension as it appears on your computer screen and divide by whichever of those numbers is appropriate for your measuring system. That's the approximate, effective magnification. On my 1680 X 945 pixel (19.5" at 120 ppi) laptop screen, the Imageshack image measures 3.75" (95.3 mm).

Thus, screen dimension/real dimension = magnification.
And, 3.75/0.125 = 30 (1/8" = 0.125")
Or, 95.3/3.2 = 29.78

Thus, the final magnification on my screen is about 30X. Your mileage will vary.

Another criticism I have is that the images are all bluish, and a shortcoming of the software I'm using is that its color balance feature doesn't work with this scope since they weren't made for each other. Hypothetically, I could "photoshop" the images by hand to compensate, but my visual "color guesser" doesn't work good enough. :(

I would describe this project as showing promise, but it needs more serious work. If you find a scope that works the way it's supposed to right out of the box (And why not? All these are, are slightly modified webcams!) let the rest of us know ASAP. I needs a good low power scope!


"Herman, hold this here regalis while I takes yor picher."



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Please send all E-mail postings directly to schultz@ucalgary.ca
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 Post subject: Re: Cameras and magnifiers!
PostPosted: Tue Oct 22, 2013 3:28 am 
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Location: Tycho Base, Luna
Since you asked, Stan...

I asked Mr Microscope (Christian) for some advice when I was considering purchasing a USB scope for work.
I actually listened to him and had my office purchase a Dino-Lite Pro, along with a flexible arm stand (pretty useless without the stand IMO). I believe it was around $200 or so.

It worked well right out of the box, and it's been used by 4 or 5 other folks in the office, none of which had any prior experience with scopes of this nature. It's got a self contained light (using additional light makes it better), a fairly nice focusing ring and you can take photos from the keyboard, that way touching the scope doesn't blur your photos.

Here's a shot I took with it of a patella on my female B. smithi:
Image


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