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 Post subject: Scorpion #2
PostPosted: Sun Feb 14, 2010 1:07 am 
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A toss up of the following three:

V. spinigerus

S. mesaensis

H. arizonensis/spadix

I'm looking for price guidelines for the following and also would appreciate estimate lifespan for S. mesaensis. To anyone that can help me, thanks a lot !!


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 Post subject: Re: Scorpion #2
PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 5:33 pm 
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Location: Detroit, southeastern Michigan, U,S.A.
T-Freak wrote:
A toss up of the following three:

V. spinigerus

S. mesaensis

H. arizonensis/spadix

I'm looking for price guidelines for the following and also would appreciate estimate lifespan for S. mesaensis. To anyone that can help me, thanks a lot !!


T-Freak,

Depending on what you're looking for in a scorp? Overall, Vaejovis spinigerus is the easiest to maintain and I have specimens that are slightly over 6 years old in age. They're the smallest of the three species listed at around 60 to 75 mm adult TL (Total Length) and the least defensive. They are incredibly hardy, breed readily in captivity, and the young will mature (depending on several factors) in 20 to 28 months. The young are also very hardy and easy to maintain.

For fast, very active, and moderately long-lived (I suspect at least 7 to 10 years?), go with S. mesaensis! For this species you'll need a spacious enclosure, filled with sand, and temps in excess of 82 degrees. They will readily breed in captivity and the young are not as hardy as the young of V. spinigerus. I am currently rearing litters from three different WC females, and while losses have not been high (less than 10%) per litter, they are a bit tempermental when it comes to environmental conditions. Also, unlike as stated in a previous work in which specimens of both genders reached sexual maturity at the 7th instar, males and females reach maturity at either the 7th or 8th instar (unpublished data).

However, if you want large (over 110 mm TL), heavy, and long-lived (up to 25+ years), you'll want H. arizonensis. They will breed and reproduce in captivity but the offspring are very demanding and few live past the second-instar. Hadrurus spadix is the most attractive of the three US Hadrurus species and require a more mesic set-up than their thermoxerophilic cousins. They are also accomplished climbers and for the most part, are not as spontaneously defensive as H. arizonensis.

Regardless of species, the venoms of all three species may produce slight to moderately painful localized symptoms but none of the three species or their venoms are considered medically significant to humans.

Specimens of all three species are inexpensive. I've seen V. spinigerus for USD 3-10 and the other two species (adults) from USD 10-25 each. You can purchase adult fems or males of V. spinigerus for USD 39.50 per dozen or adult males and females of H. arizonensis for USD 8.95 each, from Spider Pharm down in Yarnell, AZ (http://spiderpharm.com). Specimens from Spider Pharm are high-quality, wild-caught specimens and are accurately sexed.

Cheers,
Luc


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 Post subject: Re: Scorpion #2
PostPosted: Wed Mar 03, 2010 5:04 am 
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Hello and thanks for the informative reply.

Unfortunately when I went to get my second scorpion, none of those 3 were available from the supplier at the moment. It was either P. imperator, H. paucidens or M. martensii. Wanting to avoid any buthid and not really wanting another emperor, I picked the H. paucidens.

I was hoping for a male since the majority are wild caught and frankly I'm still not ready to accomodate a bunch of scorplings in case I'd get a gravid female by chance.

Fortunately, I received an adult male. Had him for nearly two weeks now and has yet to eat. It's always in hiding. One thing that worries me is that currently I have no heat mat yet for him and I'm quite sure the room temperature isin't warm enough for him and causes him to be lethargic. I'm receiving a couple in a week or so since the same seems to be occuring with my P. imperator. He has been holed up in his burrow for several weeks but the crickets I drop weekly seem to dissapear.

But my next scorpion would likely be V. spinigerus since H. arizonensis is more demanding when it comes to designing the enclosure and I'd rather have a species that will be fine on a small layer of substrate.

Thanks again for the info. I take all information provided very seriously.


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