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 Post subject: dead scorps
PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2010 4:03 pm 
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Location: Florida panhandle
My son and I bought some emp's at a show last July. Sadly, only one of the 3 remains. I understand that these were probably wc. They are housed in an aquarium with forest floor substrate and moss, we try to limit the ventilation to keep it moist. the enclosure is misted occasionally and there are 2 hides, a log and a water dish. I am curious about how often they should be fed. Is it possible they didn't get enough to eat? We feed a few (2-4)crickets each every week. I sure hope we didn't starve them to death! :(


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Sat Feb 20, 2010 3:55 am 
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You fed them enough. It may have been a ventilation problem. You can't let the air get stagnant in an enclosure, and the substrate shouldn't be too wet. It promotes fungal and bacterial growth. I think these and Heterometrus spp. (the ones I've had experience with) do best when kept warm as well. My H. spinifer wouldn't eat when kept at ~70-75 degrees. When I offered it an 80-85 degree side, it started eating sort of regularly and fattened up to normal proportions.


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Sun Feb 21, 2010 3:40 pm 
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Location: Florida panhandle
thats good to know. I will remove the cover and see how the last one fares. thanks


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2010 9:20 pm 
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What is 'forest floor' substrate? I hope it isn't one of those that are pine, cedar, or a similar wood product. Those contain terpenes, a natural chemical that is insecticidal. Think of a cedar chest that preserves woolens by killing moths. If so, try potting soil instead. Scorpions have been living in soil for millenia and any attempt to sell you other media is for someone to make money off of you and not for the sake of the animals.


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Mon Mar 01, 2010 3:13 pm 
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I was thinking that 'forest floor' substrate was just the brand name of one of the several coconut coir products on the market. Most are sold as compressed bricks which are moistened to make them expand. These products are at least safe and are (in my opinion) probably the best thing the pet trade has to offer for arachnids (of course you can buy equally good substrates at your local garden center for less but that's another topic). Because I made that assumption I didn't think the substrate was the issue.

However, just to make sure, I searched the name and discovered that it is actually ZooMed's brand of cypress mulch! Although accumulated anecdotal hobbyist experience seems to suggest that cypress is not as bad as pine or cedar, it IS related to those trees and therefore could indeed cause problems for your scorpions long term. The fact that it doesn't kill them quickly is probably the reason it is still used extensively by some. Even if it was safe, it doesn't really offer any advantages either, as it will not hold a burrow very well. I'd replace it with something else.

Wade


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Tue Mar 02, 2010 4:46 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 22, 2006 8:55 am
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Location: Detroit, southeastern Michigan, U,S.A.
oogpister wrote:
My son and I bought some emp's at a show last July. Sadly, only one of the 3 remains. I understand that these were probably wc. They are housed in an aquarium with forest floor substrate and moss, we try to limit the ventilation to keep it moist. the enclosure is misted occasionally and there are 2 hides, a log and a water dish. I am curious about how often they should be fed. Is it possible they didn't get enough to eat? We feed a few (2-4)crickets each every week. I sure hope we didn't starve them to death! :(


Greetz,

As emperors, Pandinus imperator are from hot, humid environs throughout West Africa, a suitable set-up should include a moist (not saturated) 4 to 6-inch layer of substrate (premium grade topsoil, potting soil (without chemical additives), or any other substrate that has the capacity to retain moisture), one to several cork bark or palm root pieces for shelter, and a water bowl. Temperatures should be kept in the range of 85 to 90F, and if possible, a 5 degree drop during the night but not below 80F. While emperors seem to be primarily nocturnal, reports suggest that they may become surface active during the day in heavily forested areas with reduced light levels. It is NOT necessary to saturate the substrate or attempt to maintain RH (humidity levels) in the 90's. Keep the substrate moist to the touch and RH above 80%. Keep ventilation moderate. When rehydrating the substrate, simply pour distilled water directly upon the substrate as misting has very little real value in rehydrating substrate moisture levels.

For feeding adults I'd recommend any of the larger roach species (e.g. Blaptica dubia), locusts, or at the very least, adult (18 to 27 mm) common house crickets (Acheta domesticus). Adults need only be fed 1 to 2 appropriately-sized prey items every 15 days (two feedings per month). Exceptionally large (7-inch plus) specimens can be fed every 10 days.

Lastly, promptly remove dead prey or prey remains from the enclosure to avoid infestations from various mites (primarily of the genus Sancassania) that thrive under such environmental conditions as above.

Best of luck,
Luc


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 Post subject: Re: dead scorps
PostPosted: Wed May 12, 2010 1:52 am 
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Location: Florida panhandle
Hmm, just got around to reading the lasts posts. Still have scorp, appears to be doing well. Is "out" a lot. Have since moved to a shorter tank (6" in height) but still has plenty of room to stroll. Changed substrate to coir. But now I'm wondering about the 'strate I have my hissers on (cypress). I guess I'm off to another forum to find out! I'm glad to know about how wet to keep the substrate and how much to feed. thanks very much.


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